Viktor Emil Frankl

Viktor Emil Frankl

Viktor Emil Frankl was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist, and a Holocaust survivor, of Theresienstadt, Auschwitz, Kaufering and Türkheim. Frankl was the founder of logotherapy (literally "healing through meaning") a meaning-centered school of psychotherapy, considered the Third Viennese School of Psychotherapy following the theories developed by Sigmund Freud and Alfred Adler. Logotherapy is part of existential and humanistic psychology theories. He is the author of over 39 books; he is most noted for his best-selling book Man's Search for Meaning based on his experiences in various Nazi concentration camps.
In 1948, Frankl earned a Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Vienna. His dissertation, The Unconscious God, is an examination of the relation of psychology and religion. In this, Frankl advocates for the use of the Socratic dialogue or "self-discovery discourse" to be used with clients, to get in touch with their "Noetic" (or spiritual) unconscious.In 1955, Frankl was awarded a professorship of neurology and psychiatry at the University of Vienna, and as visiting professor, he lectured at Harvard University (1961), at Southern Methodist University, Dallas (1966), and at Duquesne University, Pittsburgh (1972).
Soon after his return to Vienna, he wrote Man’s Search for Meaning over a 9-day period. The book, originally titled, “A Psychologist Experiences the Concentration Camp” was released in German in 1946. The first edition cover does not identify who wrote it because Frankl felt he could express himself more freely. He was surprised that out of the numerous books he wrote, the one that he wanted to publish anonymously became his most popular.The English translation of Man’s Search for Meaning was published in 1959 and became an international bestseller. He saw this not so much as a personal achievement, but as a symptom of the "mass neurosis of modern times" since its title promised to deal with the question of life’s meaningfulness.

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Man's Search For Meaning: The classic tribute to hope from the Holocaust

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